Grow and Convert Customers From Content

Sep 15, 2018
Business Marketing
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What separates the people that see explosive growth with content marketing from everyone else?

You know the type: They have a blog that gets tons of engagement, they attract their target customers, they get measurable leads and sales, they get industry influencers to guest post, and they often get featured in top publications.
It seems like every post they write gets tons of comments, attracts their exact customers, who happily try their product, shop at their store, or talk to their sales team.

Some of these marketers even write recap posts outlining six or seven figures of revenue attributable to leads from the blog.

But most blogs aren’t anywhere close to this.

For most marketers, the blog is a “placeholder”: it exists because they think they should have one, but it only brings in a trickle of traffic, very little comments, and fewer customers.

They end up spending most of their time in other channels, and often begin to resent the need to “publish regularly” (as we’ll show below, that’s not necessary).

For these marketers, content marketing is an expense — but perhaps more toxic, it’s a mental burden.

If you’re blogging for yourself (solopreneur, small agency owners, etc.), you begin to question whether it’s worth it and what you’re doing wrong.

If you’re doing content marketing inside of a company (as a consultant or an employee), you’re well aware that it takes time and money to run the blog, hire writers and pay developers. You may be working hard at it, but the results aren’t coming and meanwhile the CMO and CEO are questioning the ROI of your efforts.

If they pressed you, you’re not even confident you could defend the ROI.

Or, if you’re getting traffic, it’s often not the right kind of traffic: you’re attracting the wrong audience or you’re not seeing any conversions coming from it.

So what are successful bloggers and content-focused companies doing that others are not? What do the marketers inside those companies know that everyone else is struggling to find?

The key is systems.

Getting a steady stream of ideal, ready-to-purchase customers requires a system:

A system for writing content that attracts the right traffic
A system for turning that traffic into leads
A system for diverting some of that traffic directly to a store or pricing page
A system for growth
A system for turning email subscribers into customers

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